Archives for posts with tag: Social

Over the past 3 decades business related information technology has experienced three key era’s of growth. While the first two era’s are somewhat related, in that they both focused on productivity gains, the third era is quite a bit different.

Evolution of the Enterprise v02 MA 22Dec2015Below are what I consider the 5 key differentiator’s between the era of “the collaborative enterprise”, and the eras of “the productive employee” and “the productive enterprise”:

  • Focus on B2C vs. B2B: Social and mobile have an impact on both B2B and B2C, however arguably the greater impact is on how organizations engage with external constituents (i.e., customers or citizens) vs. internal constituents (i.e., partners or employees).
  • The agile enterprise: Build. Measure. Learn. When you are building a product for the consumer, its best to build lean and iterate vs. to build bulky and pray.
  • Centrality of UX: If you cannot impress a consumer in the first 30-60 seconds of interaction with a new mobile app, then you might have lost them forever. In this new world, UX is king.
  • Decentralized creativity: Ideas for new and interesting products and services, and suggestions for improvement, can come from internal or external constituents, not just top level management.
  • Driving top line growth: The primary focus of enhancing personal or organization productivity is cost minimization. While effective customer engagement can no doubt reduce cost, its biggest pull lies in driving new revenue.

Each of the above differences warrants a deeper look, and we will do so in future blog posts, but the bottom line is this – the productivity-related eras are giving way to a much more collaborative era.

Advertisements

This is in response to an article on Forbes by John Mancini. John’s basic premise is that Enterprise IT is too slow, too bloated and generally unable to keep pace with the changes brought about by Social, Mobile and the Cloud. While there is some truth to his argument, that large Enterprise IT departments are reluctant to cede control, the truth is a lot more complex than that.

Most IT organization today are focussed on keeping systems up and running, through various integration touch points, and a myriad of custom and packaged enterprise applications. Large organizations have upwards of a 1000 enterprise apps, integration touch points and their corresponding infrastructure to support. It’s easy to suggest that IT doesn’t get it, however remember that business professionals are not the only ones that use social media, mobile and cloud, in terms of personal use IT professionals are probably the earlier adopters of these technologies. However someone has to worry about keeping the monster running, and that thankless job falls on IT.

All this being said, the points being made in the article are still valid, i.e. IT needs to evolve from worrying about systems integration, to worrying about data (the “information” part of IT) and adding business value through the wealth of data and information processing capabilities being made available through social, mobile and the cloud. But the road to this, particularly for large organizations is littered with vested interests, legacy apps, band-aids put together to keep apps up and running, and over a decade spent by most companies chasing wage arbitrage opportunities in IT.